War on Drugs

Drug Policy

War on Drugs

Our nation’s misguided and costly "War on Drugs" has undermined civil liberties in many ways — eroding protections against unlawful searches and seizures, imposing overly harsh sentences on individuals, disproportionately impacting communities of color. The ACLU of Washington Drug Policy Project works for policies that treat drug use as a public health concern, not a criminal justice matter, through public education, legislative advocacy, and litigation.
Washington Marijuana Legalization: We hope that marijuana reform will spark change throughout the criminal justice system
https://www.aclu-wa.org/sites/default/files/styles/alt/public/media-images/panel-panes/website_graphics_2up_panel_pane_urge_seattle_safe_consumption.png?itok=TQ6ME8XT
Courts should review harsh sentences from ill-conceived drug laws
Lead: Law enforcement assisted diversion

Resources

News Release, Published: 
Thursday, February 25, 2010
The ACLU supports marijuana legalization and will continue to work toward that goal.  However, we will not be supporting I-1068 because it does not provide a responsible regulatory system. 
News Release, Published: 
Tuesday, February 23, 2010
The ACLU of Washington has filed an amicus memorandum urging the state Supreme Court to accept review of a case in which an employee was fired solely for her lawful, at home, medical use of marijuana.
News Release, Published: 
Tuesday, February 23, 2010
News Release, Published: 
Thursday, December 10, 2009
I am well aware that the intent in drafting this policy, the goal, is to help students by identifying drug users and then assisting them into treatment and by deterring drug and alcohol use. These are good goals. But the reading I have been doing suggests the policy may in fact result in the opposite outcome -increased problem drug or alcohol use.
News Release, Published: 
Wednesday, December 9, 2009
The ACLU-WA advocates for alternatives to rigid "zero tolerance" policies that result in overly harsh school discipline – policies that contribute to the "school-to-prison pipeline" whereby students are expelled and end up in the criminal justice system.
News Release, Published: 
Monday, December 7, 2009
News Release, Published: 
Friday, November 20, 2009
The Washington Supreme Court today rejected a seriously ill woman’s plea to use medical marijuana to alleviate chronic pain, even though she had a doctor’s written recommendation. The 6-3 ruling points to the need to clarify the state’s medical marijuana law to ensure that patients are able to exercise their rights under the law.
News Release, Published: 
Friday, November 20, 2009
City governments around the state are rethinking their urine-testing policies in the wake of the ACLU's success in curbing Seattle's suspicionless urine-testing program.
News Release, Published: 
Friday, November 20, 2009
Skamania County Superior Court Judge E. Thompson Reynolds today sentenced a seriously ill medical marijuana patient to 60 days of electronic home detention, despite the fact that she had her doctor’s written recommendation for medical marijuana. The sentence for Sharon Tracy came after the Washington Supreme Court in November 2006 had rejected her doctor’s written recommendation for medical marijuana because the doctor was licensed in another state. Tracy, who is on public assistance, was also ordered to pay $3,000 in appeal costs plus the costs of her home detention.
News Release, Published: 
Friday, November 20, 2009
One of the most insidious features of the War on Drugs has been government seizures and closures of the property of people who are not involved in illegal activities. The Washington Court of Appeals dealt these practices a setback when it ruled in April, 2000 that the state’s drug nuisance abatement law was unconstitutional as applied to Oscar's II, a Seattle nightclub.

Pages