Latest From ACLU of Washington

The latest content and updates from the ACLU of Washington website.

Published: 
Friday, September 15, 2017
Confronting the role of structural racism in policing (and elsewhere) must be at the core of our work to save lives and ensure police are there to serve and protect.
Published: 
Wednesday, September 13, 2017
Protest—and engagement in vigorous political debate—lies at the core of our democracy.  But incitement to violence, and actual participation in violence, has no place in the First Amendment. Cities and their police departments have a duty to protect all residents from physical violence while accommodating the rights of all people who seek to protest. Here are some questions and answers about First Amendment, free speech, and protest rights.

Voting Rights Restoration in Washington State

Document, Published: 
Tuesday, September 12, 2017
Under Washington law, individuals convicted of felonies that have their right to vote automatically restored as soon as they have completed incarceration and any community custody required by the Department of Corrections. This brochure briefly explains the law and answers frequently asked questions.  

Frequently Asked Questions About Voting Restoration in Washington

Document, Published: 
Tuesday, September 12, 2017
The 2009 Washington Legislature passed a new law that restores the right to vote automatically to people with felony convictions when they have completed their time in prison and have served any required community custody supervised by the State Department of Corrections (DOC).
News Release, Published: 
Thursday, September 7, 2017
Today the ACLU of Washington is asking the U.S. District Court in Seattle to issue a preliminary injunction to stop the City of Seattle and the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) from taking and throwing away property owned by people living outside.

Know Your Rights: Police In Schools

Document, Published: 
Thursday, September 7, 2017
Many schools have police officers stationed on campus. Other schools may call police to respond to particular situations. Even though you are in school, you still have rights when interacting with police.

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