Harm Reduction

Resources

Published: 
Thursday, September 5, 2019
Published: 
Tuesday, August 27, 2019
Nearly thirty years ago, when he was 18 years old, Sy Eubanks had surgery for a knee injury he got while competing on his high school’s wrestling team. His doctor prescribed him opioid painkillers, the dangers of which are now widely known. All Sy knew was that he liked the feelings his prescription gave him and he wanted more.
News Release, Published: 
Tuesday, April 30, 2019
The Whatcom County Jail will provide people in the jail with opioid use disorder (OUD) the medications necessary to treat their addiction, according to the settlement agreement proposed in a class-action civil rights lawsuit filed by the ACLU of Washington.
News Release, Published: 
Thursday, June 7, 2018
The ACLU of Washington has filed a class-action civil rights lawsuit against Whatcom County and the Whatcom County Sheriff’s Office for denying people with opioid use disorder (OUD) in the County Jail medications necessary to treat their addiction.
Published: 
Thursday, April 12, 2018
Civil liberties highlights from the 2018 Washington State Legislative Session
Published: 
Friday, September 16, 2016
A King County task force recently released cutting-edge policy recommendations about how to confront the region’s opiate epidemic. With ACLU-WA participation, the task force is continuing the county’s pioneering work in treating drug abuse as a public health issue, rather than as a criminal matter.
Published: 
Friday, March 4, 2016
Heavy-handed law enforcement is one of the primary ways society has attempted to deal with the complicated issue of drug abuse. Responding to problematic drug use from a public health perspective is a far better approach.
Published: 
Friday, November 18, 2011
In 2010, the ACLU of Washington was instrumental in the passage of the nation’s second “911 Good Samaritan” law. New research from the University of Washington’s Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute shows that the 911 Good Samaritan law works.
Published: 
Friday, October 28, 2011
One disturbing consequence of the Patriot Act, which just marked its ten-year anniversary, is how it has been used for law enforcement actions not related to combating terrorism -- the rationale for the Act's passage. A glaring example can be seen in the use of "sneak and peak” searches for drug crimes.
Published: 
Friday, September 16, 2011
As flu season approaches, Washingtonians should be thankful that they can still purchase the highly effective decongestant pseudoephedrine over the counter and don’t need to get a prescription (which some states now require). However, they should also be somewhat disgruntled that they must now have their personal information (name, address, amount purchased) submitted into a newly created database that will track their purchases. Since 2005, paper logs had to be maintained for pseudoephedrine sales in Washington, but there was no centrally housed electronic database.

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