Latest From ACLU of Washington

The latest content and updates from the ACLU of Washington website.

News Release, Published: 
Monday, April 9, 2018
The Washington Supreme Court on April 5 became the first court in the nation to adopt a court rule aimed at eliminating both implicit and intentional racial bias in jury selection.
Published: 
Thursday, April 5, 2018
The individual will manage front desk volunteers, collaborate with colleagues to accomplish HR-related tasks, including assisting in recruitment and onboarding processes, and provide operational support to the entire office.
News Release, Published: 
Tuesday, March 27, 2018
Governor Jay Inslee signed into law a bill (HB 1783), which helps address Washington State's broken system for imposing and collecting legal financial obligations (LFOs) from people too poor to pay.
Published: 
Friday, March 23, 2018
A rule proposed by Trump’s Department of Health and Human Services would let health care providers use their religious beliefs to justify turning away patients in need.
News Release, Published: 
Wednesday, March 21, 2018
The ACLU of Washington and ACLU affiliates in California and eight other states sent a letter to Greyhound Lines Inc. to urge the company to change its policies and refuse U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) permission to conduct raids on buses without warrants.

ACLU letter to Greyhound Bus

Document, Published: 
Wednesday, March 21, 2018
ACLU affiliates in ten states call for Greyhound Bus to demand a warrant before allowing CBP agents to do inspections on buses
Published: 
Friday, March 16, 2018
You could win a trip to the ACLU Membership Conference in D.C. Submit an essay for the ACLU of Washington youth essay contest.
Published: 
Monday, March 12, 2018
America’s juvenile justice system was established more than 100 years ago with the goal of rehabilitating youth who break the law. It reflects the belief that children who commit offenses should have an opportunity to account for their wrongdoing, change their behavior, and become productive members of society. But since 1997 Washington courts have treated some youth differently under a law called "automatic decline."
News Release, Published: 
Tuesday, March 6, 2018
The Washington Legislature has passed a bill (E2SHB 1783) which will ensure that poor people are not unfairly jailed or tied for years to the criminal justice system because they are unable to pay court-imposed debts known as Legal Financial Obligations (LFOs).

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